Other

Meyer Lemon Margaritas


Ingredients

  • 3 Ounces freshly-squeezed Meyer lemon juice
  • 3 Ounces triple sec
  • 3 Ounces tequila
  • Kosher salt
  • Lemon wedges, for garnish
  • Edible pansies (optional)

Directions

Pour approximately ¼ cup salt into a small saucer.

Run a lemon wedge over the rims of two glasses (margarita or double old-fashioned), then invert glass and dip rim of each glass into the salt.

Add a few cubes of ice to each glass and set aside.

Fill a shaker with crushed ice.

Pour lemon juice, tequila and triple sec into shaker and cover. Shake vigorously.

Pour drinks into each glass, and top with lemon wedges and edible flowers, if using.

Serve immediately.

Nutritional Facts

Servings2

Calories Per Serving239

Folate equivalent (total)9µg2%


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

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And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


THE AMERICAN TABLE: Recipe for Meyer lemon margarita

I long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless reminded me why.

The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possibly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange colour and are slightly less acidic than common lemons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons.

Trending Stories

And I'm particularly fond of using them in drinks. That's just one reason I've fallen in love with Bayless' new cookbook, "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks." In it, he has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days.

This summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted coffee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing.

When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it's also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sipping tequila.

Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watching party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavour is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game.

For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cocktail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.

Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active)

1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below)

1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lemons)

1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below)

8 lemon twists, to garnish

In a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.

MEYER LEMON INFUSED TEQUILA

Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active)

Makes one 750-millilitre bottle

750-millilitre bottle 100 per cent blue agave blanco tequila

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavours to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day.

Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant colour for 1 to 2 months.

Start to finish: 15 minutes

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for several weeks.

(Recipes from Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless' "Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks," W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Elizabeth Karmel is a grilling and Southern foods expert and executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market restaurants in New York and Washington, as well as Hill Country Chicken in New York. She is the author of three cookbooks, including "Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned."


Watch the video: Cocktail Mixing Techniques meyer lemon u0026 limoncello margarita (December 2021).